Useful links

Harvard University

 

www.harvard.edu

Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The university has been accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges since 1929. The university offers 46 undergraduate concentrations (majors), 134 graduate degrees, and 32 professional degrees.

MIT

 

www.web.mit.edu

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, founded in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States. The institute adopted a European polytechnic university model and stressed laboratory instruction in applied science and engineering. MIT’s early emphasis on applied technology at the undergraduate and graduate levels led to close cooperation with industry.

Stanford University

 

www.stanford.edu

Leland Stanford Junior University, or more commonly Stanford University, is a private research university in Stanford, California. It is one of the most prestigious universities in the world. Stanford was opened on October 1, 1891 as a coeducational and non-denominational institution.

University of Oxford

 

www.ox.ac.uk

The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University or simply Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England. While having no known date of foundation, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world, and the world’s second-oldest surviving university.

University of Pennsylvania

 

www.upenn.edu

The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn) is an American private Ivy League research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Benjamin Franklin, Penn’s founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple “faculties” (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution.

University of California-Los Angeles

 

www.ucla.edu

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), is a public research university located in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, United States. Founded in 1919, it is the second-oldest campus of the University of California system. UCLA is one of the two flagship universities in the UC system (alongside UC Berkeley). It offers 337 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in a wide range of disciplines.

University of Cambridge

 

www.cam.ac.uk

The University of Cambridge is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209, Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world’s third-oldest surviving university. It grew out of an association formed by scholars leaving the University of Oxford after a dispute with townsfolk; the two “ancient universities” have many common features and are often jointly referred to as “Oxbridge”.

Duke University

 

www.duke.edu

Duke University is a private research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. In 1924, tobacco and electric power industrialist James B. Duke established The Duke Endowment, at which time the institution changed its name to honor his deceased father, Washington Duke.

ISI master journal list

 

www.isinet.com/mjl

The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) was founded by Eugene Garfield in 1960. It was acquired by Thomson Scientific & Healthcare in 1992, became known as Thomson ISI and now is part of the Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters. ISI offered bibliographic database services. Its specialty: citation indexing and analysis, a field pioneered by Garfield. It maintains citation databases covering thousands of academic journals, including a continuation of its longtime print-based indexing service the Science Citation Index (SCI), as well as the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), and the Arts and Humanities Citation Index (AHCI). All of these are available via ISI’s Web of Knowledge database service. This database allows a researcher to identify which articles have been cited most frequently, and who has cited them. The database not only provides an objective measure of the academic impact of the papers indexed in it, but also increases their impact by making them more visible and providing them with a quality label.

Universities ranking

 

www.webometrics.info

The “Webometrics Ranking of World Universities” is an initiative of the Cybernetics Lab, a research group belonging to the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), the largest public research body in Spain. They try to do the best for not including fake institutions, checking especially online, international and foreign branches if they have independent web domain or sub-domain.

Nobel Prize

 

www.nobelprize.org

The Nobel Prize is a set of annual international awards bestowed in a number of categories by Swedish and Norwegian committees in recognition of cultural and/or scientific advances. The will of the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel established the prizes in 1895. The prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace were first awarded in 1901. The related Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences was created in 1968. Between 1901 and 2012, the Nobel Prizes and the Prize in Economic Sciences were awarded 555 times to 856 people and organizations. With some receiving the Nobel Prize more than once, this makes a total of 835 individuals (791 men and 44 women) and 21 organizations.